Control how Skype for Business users join meetings

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Had an interesting request lately, where a company wanted to control how users join meetings when they click the “Join” on their Skype for Business clients’ calendar tab or when they join Skype for Business meetings from Outlook.

In the client’s options, we have the ability to choose what happens when we join meetings; We can join immediately using the Skype for Business client or choose from four different phone numbers, all of which must be populated in our contact card, and can be seen under Tools -> Options -> Phones.
If your AD is configured right, you should have your Work phone (ideally your Skype for Business line URI), your Mobile phone, your Home phone and maybe even an additional ‘other’ phone.
You can also manually add phone numbers if they’re not automatically updated from AD.

Phones tabNow if you scroll down the tabs to “Skype Meetings”, this is where all the fun begins:

Meetings tab

In the tab above you can choose any of the numbers you have in the ‘Phones’ tab and get to choose whether you’d like to be prompted at the beginning of each meeting which device you’d like to use, or just go with what you chose.

How do you control it?

Like most things, the Registry.
You can make changes to the user’s preferences but not grey-out the options. If the users want to bypass the setting they can, but they’ll be defaulted to your setting at logon.

First, decide if you want the user to be prompted with each call. If yes, we need to tick the “Before I join meetings, ask me which audio device I want to use”.

The registry setting fro this checkbox is located at

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\16.0\Lync

The key is

AllowOverridingDeviceAtJoinTime

If it’s set to 1 – it means the box is ticked and the user will be prompted to choose which device they’d like to join the meeting from.
If it’s set to 0 – it means the box is unticked, and the user will automatically join via the configured device.

Choosing a device is the next funny setting:
Same registry location as above, look for the following key:

JoinAudioConferenceFrom

The setting of the last binary bit is as follows, as reflected in the users’ “Phones” tab:

0 – Do not join Audio.
1 – The Skype for Business client.
2 – Work Phone (If different from your Skype for Business line uri).
3 – Mobile.
4 – Home.
5 – Other.

If one of the above is not configured or missing, the client will default to “Do not join Audio”.

For example, if I want to set my users to join from their mobile phones without being prompted, I’ll set the AllowOverridingDeviceAtJoinTime registry key to 0 and the JoinAudioConferenceFrom key to 3.

Registry settings

 

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Skype for Business Response Groups Diagrams

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This is something I was looking for every time I had a deployment with multiple Response Groups.

Customers and management would usually like to see a graphic chart of how the Response Groups’ workflows work, what are the timeout and over flow options, what’s the chosen routing method for each group,  and who are the users in each group.

Looking at Matt Landis‘ great Get-csRgsWorkflowDiagram script, I was inspired (and in need) to do something similar.

Took a while to get it where I wanted, but the version published here now is one I’m very happy about and it actually gives me everything I was looking for.

It’s actually two files;

  • One file is the script that you should run from your PC.
  • The second file is a custom Visio stencil (.vss file) that will be downloaded to your “My Shapes” folder (That’s always in your “My Documents” folder after you install Visio) and will provide the Visio images for the script. You can find it here if you wish to download it to your machine beforehand.
    The script will detect proxy\download issues and will prompt you to download the VSS file manually if required.

Prerequisites

  • Run this script from your workstation – not from the server. It doesn’t matter if your workstation is in the domain or not.
  • You’ll need an installation of Visio on that machine.
  • PowerShell 3.0 is a must.
  • ADDS RSAT is required if you’re sing Active Directory Distribution Groups for some of your Response Groups’ groups. We’re using the AD PowerShell Module to expand these groups and list their users.
  • Your Lync\S4B pool’s FQDN and administrator credentials.
  • Your Execution policy set to Bypass, at least until I start signing my scripts…

Running the script

From PowerShell, run the file, it will immediately prompt you for your Pool’s FQDN:

Pool Name

Enter your pool’s name and you’ll be prompted for credentials:

Creds

The script will generate a list of all your Response Groups. Pick up a Response Group nunmber from the list, or hit 0 for all Response Groups. Each workflow will be drawn in a new page:

WF List

If required, it will download the Visio stencil and place it in your “My Shapes” folder:

VSS

The script will start drawing the diagram in the background:

Drawings

Upon completion, the script will auto-save the file to your My Documents folder:

Path

The file is saved with the workflow’s name and the creation date:

File

And is ready to be opened:

Visio Window

For multiple Response Groups you’ll have multiple pages, each with the Workflow’s name.

Diagrams are scaled to fit the pages, but might be larger due to large number of agents in a group.

Known Issues

  • This script was tested in English, you might experience some issues if you’re running Visio under a different language.
  • Windows 10 OS build 10565 can’t install ADDS RSAT – the script will not expand Distribution Groups.

Download

Please download the script here.

Skype for Business Users’ pictures from URLs

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This was out first on the November 2013 update for Lync Server 2013 where Microsoft brought back the (not so) loved Lync 2010 feature feature of allowing users to set their Lync pictures to internet accessible photos.
Soon, all users in the organization were superheroes and Sports Illustrated models.

Users that were not enabled for this feature will only see the following when trying to change their photo:

No photo option

A short command will add this feature to any policy that you had at the time and you could later control this with the Set-CsClientPolicy -DisplayPhoto, specifying “NoPhoto”,
“PhotosFromADOnly”, or “AllPhotos”

Now, what happens if you have a new client policy that requires this feature? (Or you never enabled it before?)

First, find out which policies are enabled with this feature by running the following:

Get-CsClientPolicy | ft Identity,PolicyEntry

The result should be similar to this:

Before

unless this was never enabled in your environment, then all of the above should be empty with only “{}”.

Now choose the policy you want to assign this feature to and run the following command:

$NPE=New-CsClientPolicyEntry -Name EnablePresencePhotoOptions -Value True

$Policy=Get-CsClientPolicy -Identity <PolicyName>

$Policy.PolicyEntry.Add($NPE)

Set-CsClientPolicy -Instance $Policy

Make sure you replaced “<PolicyName>” with your actual policy and then run the
Get-CsClientPolicy | ft Identity,PolicyEntry” command again.
The output will now show you have that set for the policy you chose:

After

And the Client can now change their profile photo:

New Photo

Remember there’s still a restriction on picture sizes (30 KB Max) and they must be publically available.

Client

Skype for Business conferencing disclaimer

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This isn’t a new feature, but one I was recently asked about so I thought it’s worth mentioning again.

When we’re sending a Skype for Business meeting invite (either as a planned meeting via Outlook or as an ad-hoc meeting) we can configure the server to send a meeting disclaimer to all meetings (unfortunately this can only be set at a global level and will affect all of your meetings) to confirm the users joining the meeting have agreed to the T&Cs of the meeting and ticked a box to accept them and join the meeting.

The experience is pretty much identical across all platforms:

Skype for Business client:

Fatclient

Lync MX client:

MX

Skype for Business mobile client:

Mobile

Skype for Business Web App:

Notice

users who dial in to the meeting will not hear the disclaimer.

To set the disclaimer we run a pretty simple command:

Set-CsConferenceDisclaimer -Header “Welcome to y0av.com” -Body “Meetings are pure fun with Skype for Business”

 

 

 

Skype for Business Server – Assign User policies to AD groups

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This is an update to a previous version of this tool written by myself and Guy Bachar.
The updated version can now run (and was tested!) on both Lync server 2010 and 2013, and Skype for Business Server.

Run this tool from Lync Management Shell or Skype for Business Management Shell.

Note you will need to run this tool with Local Admin permissions (You will be prompted for elevation automatically if not) and you must have ADDS RSAT installed so you can use the Active Directory PowerShell Module.
You will be asked to provide an Active Directory Group name. Type the Display Name of the group, the tool will reply with the CN of the group, confirming you chose the right group:

Choose Group

Then choose the type of policy (or dial plan) you want to assign this group, there are 14 options:
1     Voice Policy
2     Client Policy
3     External Access Policy
4     Mobility Policy
5     Archiving Policy
6     Hosted Voicemail Policy
7     Client Version Policy
8     Conferencing Policy
9     Voice Routing Policy
10     Location Policy
11     PIN Policy
12     Presence Policy
13     Persistent Chat Policy
14     Dial Plan

After choosing one of the 14 options, you’ll be asked whether you want to assign the global policy to this group or choose from the existing user policies:

Choose from policies

If you choose 1 (This is always the Global policy), that will be assigned to the group.
If you choose 2, a new sub-menu will open, detailing the policies you can assign:

External Access

You will then be asked to confirm the change and the policy will be assigned the group.

The tool can be downloaded here.

 

 

 

What did the July 2015 update for Lync 2013 and Skype for Business fix?

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  • CPU usage is reduced when emoticon animations are active in multiple conversations in Skype for Business or Lync 2013:
    Occurs when you send or receive emoticon animations. The emoticons keep animating, and that overuses CPU resources.
    KB3076504
  • Add the click-to-call feature for RCC-enabled users from the contact card in Skype for Business or Lync 2013:
    If you enabled remote call control (RCC) for an account in Microsoft Lync 2013 or in Microsoft Outlook 2013,  the phone number hyperlink of the contact is not clickable.
    KB3072751
  • Active Directory contact’s name is changed to the phone number in the contact list of Skype for Business or Lync 2013:
    Occurs when a contact has no email or SIP address and only has a display name and a phone number in Active Directory.
    KB3072753
  • Typed characters take a long time to display in the message input box in Skype for Business or Lync 2013:
    Might occur on a computer that has more than 15 conversations opened in Microsoft Lync 2013.
    KB3072752
  • Chinese Contact Group name is displayed in garbled characters in Skype for Business or Lync 2013 (How can you tell?!?!?):
    Occurs on various scenarios involving Exchange Server.
    KB3072755
  • An update to the user interface for group contact counts in contact lists in Skype for Business or Lync 2013:
    This update simplifies contact lists view to only display the total number of contacts in a group instead of the online/total number in Microsoft Lync 2013.
    KB3072754